Skin diseases

A disease of the skin has been historically well known from old times. Observation of changes in the skin colour and texture has been always very important in MEDICINE.

A disease of the skin has been historically well known from old times. Observation of changes in the skin colour and texture has been always very important in MEDICINE. Now days, in the intensive department. Observations of skin have been very important. By skin now a days. Not only temperature but pulls and blood pressure can be observed.

Skin diseases

The best defense against skin cancer is protection from sunlight and other ultraviolet light.

General Information About Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin.

The skin is the body's largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (upper or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer). Skin cancer begins in the epidermis, which is made up of three kinds of cells.

PREVENTION:

  • Skin Cancer Prevention
  • Skin Cancer Treatment
  • Melanoma Treatment

Skin color and exposure to sunlight can affect the risk of developing melanoma.

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. People who think they may be at risk should discuss this with their doctor. Risk factors for melanoma include the following:

The best defense against skin cancer is protection from sunlight and other ultraviolet light.

Eczema

Eczema symptoms include itchy, red, and dry skin caused by inflammation. It's most commonly found in children, although adults can get it. There are different types of eczema. The most common is called atopic dermatitis.

Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:

  • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly
  • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes
  • Red or blond hair
  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) over long periods of time
  • Having a history of many blistering sunburns as a child
  • Having several large or many small moles
  • Having a family history of unusual moles (atypical nevus syndrome)
  • Having a family or personal history of melanoma
  • Being white and male.

There's nothing quite like the soft, delicate skin of a baby. And nothing like a cranky infant irritated by diaper rash, cradle cap, or another skin condition. While your baby is perfect, your baby's skin may not be. Many babies are prone to skin irritation in the first few months after birth. Here's how to spot and treat common baby skin problems.

Eczema is term for a group of medical conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed or irritated. The most common type of eczema is known as atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema. Atopic refers to a group of diseases with an often inherited tendency to develop other allergic conditions, such as asthma and hay fever.

Eczema affects about 10% to 20% of infants and about 3% of adults and children in the U.S. Most infants who develop the condition outgrow it by their tenth birthday, while some people continue to experience symptoms on and off throughout life. With proper treatment, the disease can be controlled in the majority of sufferers.

Eczema Health Center - Tools & Resources

  • Skin Care for Eczema
  • What Does Eczema Look Like?
  • Common Adult Skin Problems
  • When Children Have Eczema
  • Home Treatments for Eczema
  • Skin Problems in Children

Skin Conditions and Eczema

Eczema is term for a group of medical conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed or irritated. The most common type of eczema is known as atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema. Atopic refers to a group of diseases with an often inherited tendency to develop other allergic conditions, such as asthma and hay fever.

Eczema affects about 10% to 20% of infants and about 3% of adults and children in the U.S. Most infants who develop the condition outgrow it by their tenth birthday, while some people continue to experience symptoms on and off throughout life. With proper treatment, the disease can be controlled in the majority of sufferers.

See Pictures of Eczema and Other Common Skin Problems

What Are the Symptoms of Eczema?

No matter which part of the skin is affected, eczema is almost always itchy. Sometimes the itching will start before the rash appears, but when it does the rash most commonly occurs on the face, knees, hands, or feet. It may also affect other areas as well.

Affected areas usually appear very dry, thickened, or scaly. In fair-skinned people, these areas may initially appear reddish and then turn brown. Among darker-skinned people, eczema can affect pigmentation, making the affected area lighter or darker.

In infants, the itchy rash can produce an oozing, crusting condition that occurs mainly on the face and scalp, but patches may appear anywhere.

What Causes Eczema?

The exact cause of eczema is unknown, but it's thought to be linked to an overactive response by the body's immune system to an irritant. It is this response that causes the symptoms of eczema.

In addition, eczema is commonly found in families with a history of other allergies or asthma.

Some people may suffer "flare-ups" of the itchy rash in response to certain substances or conditions. For some, coming into contact with rough or coarse materials may cause the skin to become itchy. For others, feeling too hot or too cold, exposure to certain household products like soap or detergent, or coming into contact with animal dander may cause an outbreak. Upper respiratory infections or colds may also be triggers. Stress may cause the condition to worsen.

Although there is no cure, most people can effectively manage their disease with medical treatment and by avoiding irritants. The condition is not contagious and can't be spread from person to person.

How Is Eczema Diagnosed?

A pediatrician, dermatologist, or your primary care provider can make a diagnosis of eczema. Since many people with eczema also suffer from allergies, your doctor may perform allergy tests to determine possible irritants or triggers. Children with eczema are especially likely to be tested for allergies.

How Is Eczema Treated?

The goal of treatment for eczema is to relieve and prevent itching, which can lead to infection. Since the disease makes skin dry and itchy, lotions and creams are recommended to keep the skin moist. These products are usually applied when the skin is damp, such as after bathing, to help the skin retain moisture. Cold compresses may also be used to relieve itching.

Last modified on 2023-11-15 16:01:00